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Basingwerk Abbey, Holywell, Flintshire was a Cistercian Abbey, originally founded as a house of the order of Savigny in the 12th century. During the 13th century, King Edward I was based here while he built Flint Castle.

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This attraction is Visitor Attraction Quality Assurance Service (VAQAS) approved.

Bodelwyddan Castle is a regional partner of the National Portrait Gallery, London. 19th century collections at the Castle include works by George Frederic Watts, John Singer Sargent and Ford Madox Brown as well as furniture from the Victoria and Albert Museum, and sculpture from the Royal Academy of Arts.

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Local legend has it that Cadair Ifan Goch was once the seat of mythical giant, Ifan Goch, who would sit on the rock and bathe his feet in the River Conwy below.

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Dafydd ap Gruffudd built Caergwrle Castle at Caergwrle near Wrexham in about 1277.

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High on a hill above the town of Llangollen stands Castell Dinas Bran – a medieval castle and a hillfort all rolled into one.

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Artist, engraver and book illustrator Charles Tunnicliffe was born in Langley, East Cheshire.

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This attraction is Visitor Attraction Quality Assurance Service (VAQAS) approved.

Chirk Castle near Wrexham has been continuously occupied since building work was completed in 1310.

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Wales’ first great novelist, Daniel Owen was born in Mold, Flintshire and worked as an apprentice tailor until, aged 24, he left to study at The Methodist College, Bala. Within 2 years he was back at the tailor’s shop, but continued preaching – having several of his sermons published.

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This attraction is Visitor Attraction Quality Assurance Service (VAQAS) approved.

Denbigh Castle is one of the largest and strongest walled towns in the whole of Wales – the gatehouse alone is one of the toughest defensive structures of its time.

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Legend has it that once upon a time the town of Denbigh was terrorised by a fire-breathing dragon. It was living in Denbigh Castle and would regularly attack locals and their livestock.

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Elihu Yale was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of a Boston Merchant. The Yale family originally hailed from Llanarmon yn Iâl, Denbighshire, and returned to Britain when Elihu was four years old.

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Mostyn-born actor, screenwriter and director George Emlyn Williams made his acting debut on the London stage in 1927 and by 1930 had begun his screenwriting career with ‘A Murder Has Been Arranged’. He became a Broadway star in 1935 with his thriller ‘Night Must Fall’, in which he played the lead.

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This attraction is Visitor Attraction Quality Assurance Service (VAQAS) approved.

Erddig is famous for the unusually close relationship the Yorke family had with their servants.

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No mean feat, castle building. Work started on Flint Castle, Edward I’s earliest castle in Wales, in 1277.

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Opened in 1998 to carry a dual carriageway into Deeside, and as an alternative route into North Wales from north west England.

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Gerard Manley Hopkins was born into an artistic Victorian family in Essex. He began writing poetry at an early age, going on to read classics at Oxford. In 1866 he converted to Catholicism, and a year later entered a Jesuit novitiate. Thinking his poetry incompatible with his vocation, he destroyed every poem written to date – it would be 8 years before he penned another.

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Gwydir Castle near Llanrwst in the Conwy Valley dates back to 1490. Those in the know say it’s one of the finest Tudor courtyard houses in Wales.

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Helfa Gelf is an open studio initiative that showcases the working studios of more than 60 artists and crafts makers from Conwy County and Denbighshire.

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Humphrey Llwyd was born at Foxhall, Denbighshire and was educated at Oxford. A noted antiquarian and translator, Llwyd went on to to serve 15 years as the personal physician to the Earl of Arundel, Chancellor of Oxford University at the time.

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Recent theories have placed the real King Arthur in North Wales. On Halkyn mountain high above the Dee Estuary in Flintshire, is a Bronze Age hillfort. called Caer Afallwch – this is thought to be Avalon.

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Chirk Castle has been home to the Myddleton family for five centuries, and there are many versions of the legend of the red hand on their coat of arms.

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Every July since 1947 the little Welsh town of Llangollen has played host to around 50,000 visitors to Llangollen International Musical Eisteddfod.

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Llanrwst Almshouses were founded in the early 17th century by Sir John Wynn of Gwydir Castle.

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Mary Jones was a devout Calvinistic Methodist, who, aged 15 (and after six long years of saving) walked for 25 miles from her home in Llanfihangel-y-Pennant to Bala, to buy a longed-for copy of the Welsh Bible.

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Moel Arthur is one of a string of Iron Age hill forts built along the Clwydian Range around 2500 years ago.

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Moel Ty Uchaf stone circle stands on top of a hill near Corwen in Denbighshire. About 40 stones make up the circle - with the largest stone sitting at the north

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Thanks to tree-ring dating and documentary research we now know that Nantclwyd y Dre, Ruthin is one of the oldest timbered town houses in Wales.

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Every year, for a week in May, around 15,000 young performers from all over Wales come together for the Urdd Eisteddfod – Europe’s largest arts youth festival.

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The North Wales International Music Festival has just celebrated its 35th birthday. To mark the occasion there were performances by the Fron Male Voice Choir, Texaco Young Musician of Wales 2007 Glain Dafydd, Catrin Finch, Ensemble Cymru, and the BBC National Orchestra of Wales – to name a few.

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The Open Church Network is a trail that takes in a group of 16 open churches in Wrexham County Borough’s villages and towns.

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No name conjures up the Welsh pride and spirit better than that of Owain Glyndŵr. “I am not in the roll of common men” says Owain in Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part I.

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Penycloddiau (or Moel y Cloddiau), Flintshire is one of the largest Iron Age hill forts in Wales.

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This attraction is Visitor Attraction Quality Assurance Service (VAQAS) approved.

In the late 18th century Sarah Ponsonby and Lady Eleanor Butler eloped together from Ireland and settled at Plas Newydd, Llangollen, where they lived for 50 years.

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Constructed between 1795 and 1805, and said to be Telford’s most impressive work, Pontcysyllte Aqueduct was built to carry the Llangollen Canal across the Dee Valley.

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Hidden away on the outskirts of Prestatyn are the small but interesting ruins of a Roman bathhouse, thought to have been in use for about 40 years from around AD 120.

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This attraction is Visitor Attraction Quality Assurance Service (VAQAS) approved.

Rumour has it that Prince Gruffudd ap Llywelyn once had a palace at Rhuddlan. But the castle we see today was built by Master James of Saint George for Edward I between 1277 and 1282.

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Rhug chapel near Corwen is a small private chapel built for Colonel William Salusbury in 1637. From the outside it looks like any other.

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Richard Wilson was born in 1712, the son of a Montgomeryshire clergyman. His artistic talent was evident from a very young age and in 1729 he went to London to become a portrait painter. Wilson’s real passion was for landscapes though, and in 1749 he moved to Italy – studying in Venice and Rome – where he spent several years developing his distinctive landscape style.

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During the 19th Century, North Wales was home to the first Artists’ colony in Britain. Artist David Cox began spending his summers painting and drawing in and around Betws y Coed in the mid 1800s, and by 1881, the Conwy Valley was both home and holiday resort for a large number of artists.

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This attraction is Visitor Attraction Quality Assurance Service (VAQAS) approved.

This summer, the transformation of Ruthin Craft Centre will be unleashed following its redesign by Sergison Bates architects.

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This attraction is Visitor Attraction Quality Assurance Service (VAQAS) approved.

The exhibitions on display at Ruthin Gaol, house of correction since the 17th century, cover every aspect of life behind bars:

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This attraction is Visitor Attraction Quality Assurance Service (VAQAS) approved.

Winefride was the daughter of a 7th century Welsh nobleman. Her suitor, Caradog, cut her head off when she spurned his advances, and, so the story goes, a well erupted at the spot where her disembodied head fell.

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Born John Rowlands in Denbigh, and brought up in a St Asaph workhouse, Stanley left North Wales as a teenager to seek his fortune in America. In New Orleans he met wealthy trader Henry Stanley – whose name he would later assume. He served on both sides of the American Civil War, and later worked as a travel journalist.

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It seems there was nothing that Denbigh-born Sir Hugh Myddleton couldn’t turn his hand to. Myddleton worked as an apprentice goldsmith, then Royal Jeweller to King James I, clothmaker, banker, merchant, Welsh mine-owner, MP for Denbigh – and was later created a baronet.

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This attraction is Visitor Attraction Quality Assurance Service (VAQAS) approved.

St. Asaph Cathedral is reputed to be the smallest ancient cathedral in the whole of Britain. Originally built in 560 AD by Saint Kentigern, who was replaced as abbot-bishop by Saint Asaph.

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In the peaceful churchyard at Gwytherin you’ll find four ancient standing stones, each one about a metre high and nearly 3 metres apart.

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The Fron Choir of Froncysyllte was formed in 1947 with the aim of competing at the International Musical Eisteddfod in neighbouring Llangollen. Over the years, the choir has toured extensively: performing for audiences worldwide.

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The Gop near Trelawnyd, Flintshire dates back to at least 3000 years BC. It’s one of the largest prehistoric man made hills in Britain – second only to Silbury Hill in Wiltshire.

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What we know today as the Llangollen Canal was originally part of the Ellesmere Canal – Thomas Telford’s first major civil engineering project.

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This attraction is Visitor Attraction Quality Assurance Service (VAQAS) approved.

Today the Llangollen Railway uses part of the line that originally ran from Ruabon near Wrexham to Barmouth on the west coast.

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Wrexham’s greatest landmark, The Parish Church of Saint Giles, was built during the 15th and 16th centuries and is widely regarded as one of the best examples of Christian architecture in Wales.

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According to local legend, strange creatures live beneath the waters of the Witch’s Pool on Flint mountain. A 19th century farm labourer, John Roberts, is said to have died following an encounter with one of these beings.

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Born at Downing near Holywell, Flintshire, Thomas Pennant was educated at Queen’s College, Oxford, where he discovered a great love for travel and the natural world. His pioneering work in the fields of topography and zoology, and as a naturalist and prolific author forged a reputation as the foremost Welsh intellectual of the 18th century.

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Valle Crucis Abbey was founded in the 13th century and many original features survive today:

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William Ewart Gladstone was born in Liverpool and educated at Eton and Oxford. He was elected to Parliament, as a Tory, aged 23 and in 1859 joined the Liberal party. He become the Liberal leader in 1867 and British Prime Minister for the first time the following year.

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